Police/Citizen Roadway Interactions: Increasingly Stressful Affairs

In Drug Crimes by RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Drug Crimes on Thursday, March 16, 2017. What do you do if, following the sudden and flatly dismal moment that you see police lights flashing from a closely tailing squad car at night, you have dutifully come to a stop on a roadway shoulder? That is, how should you now behave? Do you just sit quietly and passively, doing nothing while waiting for the police officer to approach your vehicle from behind? Alternatively, do you think about turning on your car’s inner lights, maybe reaching over to get insurance information out of your glove compartment …

Drug Courts: The Results Speak For Themselves

In Drug Crimes by RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Drug Crimes on Friday, March 3, 2017. Take it from a judge: drug courts work. And when it comes to evaluating the outcomes linked with incarceration versus drug court participation, respectively, the comparative upsides of the latter can hardly be overstated. So says judge Michael Rumley, a principal voice and figure in the drug court program operative in Cass County in western Missouri. Rumley notes a central two-prong advantage to drug courts that makes them far better sentencing choices than a behind-bars lockup for many drug offenders. He points to these material benefits: Drug courts …

Drug-Crimes Representation: Singular Realm Where Experience Counts

In Drug Crimes by RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Drug Crimes on Thursday, February 16, 2017. Many readers of our criminal defense blog at the St. Louis law firm of Rosenblum Fry, P.C., have doubtless heard of The War on Crime and its attendant War on Drugs. Those initiatives — fervor-laden campaigns, if you will — were spawned in bygone decades when politicians both locally and across the country curried favor by espousing hard-line views regarding convicted criminal offenders. As a result of giving those views legislative teeth, sentencing outcomes for many individuals became harsh and, in some instances, draconian. The severe and uncompromising …