White Collar Crime: Growing Focus Of Regulators, Law Enforcers

In White Collar Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in White Collar Crimes on Friday, March 31, 2017. That white collar crime is increasingly on the minds of regulators and law enforcement agencies in Missouri and across the country is amply evidenced by the steady stream of media stories these days chronicling tales of alleged wrongdoing by individuals and business entities in this singular area of law. White collar probes and prosecutions might be seen by some people as comparatively less severe in nature than are investigations regarding charges related to things like drug offenses, violent crimes, sexual assault and so forth. Increasingly, that is …

Two Sides To A Criminal Case: MD’s Defense Could Be Compelling

In Drug Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Drug Crimes on Thursday, March 30, 2017. In the realm of American criminal law, certain principles stand as inviolable and absolutely crucial to the notion of fundamental justice. The presumption of innocence, for example. No criminal conviction in the absence of a finding of guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. The right of an accused to secure legal representation and defend against criminal accusations. And this: the need to mitigate the downside consequences of criminal sentencing when compelling circumstances are presented that reasonably indicate strong reasons for adjustment. We ask readers in St. Louis and across …

Parents: 3 Ways To Challenge A DUI Stop

In DWI / DUIDby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in DWI / DUID on Monday, March 20, 2017. The last thing you ever expected was to get a call from the police station stating that your child had been arrested for driving drunk. Your teen isn’t even old enough to drink. A DUI can impact your child now and in the future, so it’s important to understand how to fight against the charges. There are a few different methods, each of which has the potential to have the case dismissed. 1. Your child is innocent and the breathalyzer was wrong If your teen is adamant about …

Police/Citizen Roadway Interactions: Increasingly Stressful Affairs

In Drug Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Drug Crimes on Thursday, March 16, 2017. What do you do if, following the sudden and flatly dismal moment that you see police lights flashing from a closely tailing squad car at night, you have dutifully come to a stop on a roadway shoulder? That is, how should you now behave? Do you just sit quietly and passively, doing nothing while waiting for the police officer to approach your vehicle from behind? Alternatively, do you think about turning on your car’s inner lights, maybe reaching over to get insurance information out of your glove compartment …

Puzzle And Paradox: Why Do Some Innocent People Falsely Confess?

In Violent Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Violent Crimes on Thursday, March 9, 2017. It could likely be the ultimate conundrum in criminal law, with it perhaps never being fully understood why any human being with even a shred of rationality would ever confess to the commission of a serious crime, knowing that a harsh term of incarceration potentially awaits as a result. And yet it happens, both in St. Louis and across the country. Indeed, and as noted in a recent national media report citing evidence culled in a national database with relevant data on wrongful convictions, such convictions were linked …

Drug Courts: The Results Speak For Themselves

In Drug Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Drug Crimes on Friday, March 3, 2017. Take it from a judge: drug courts work. And when it comes to evaluating the outcomes linked with incarceration versus drug court participation, respectively, the comparative upsides of the latter can hardly be overstated. So says judge Michael Rumley, a principal voice and figure in the drug court program operative in Cass County in western Missouri. Rumley notes a central two-prong advantage to drug courts that makes them far better sentencing choices than a behind-bars lockup for many drug offenders. He points to these material benefits: Drug courts …