St. Luis County

In Recent Newsby RSF

St. Luis County Executive Steve Stenger Indicted in Federal Pay-for-Play Sting Posted April 29, 2019 Read More

White Collar Crime: Dive Down Into Tougher Proposed Legislation

In White Collar Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in White Collar Crimes on Thursday, May 16, 2019. Any claim that state and federal investigative efforts into white collar crime are lax when compared with other criminal realms has long been debunked. White collar malfeasance in Missouri and nationally has in fact been a major focus of authorities for several years running. We prominently note in our Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry May 10 blog post that there is a “spotlight on corporate wrongdoing, specifically executives’ alleged acts of financial fraud.” Public opinion broadly perceives that entry-level and intermediate-tier employees are routinely punished for alleged acts of white …

Already Spotlighted Criminal Sphere Now Receives Even Closer Focus

In White Collar Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in White Collar Crimes on Friday, May 10, 2019. There’s no question that the legal realm of white collar crime has received progressively more attention in recent years in Missouri and nationally. That has been especially true since the meltdown of the nation’s financial markets a few short years ago. The aftermath of that frightful scare put a marked spotlight on corporate wrongdoing, specifically executives’ alleged acts of financial fraud. A growing public sentiment over the past decade has coalesced around a belief that, while rank-and-file company workers (e.g., lower-level employees and middle managers) are being …

Commanding Attention: Public Release Of Police Misconduct Records

In Drug Crimesby RSF

On behalf of Rosenblum Schwartz & Fry posted in Drug Crimes on Wednesday, May 1, 2019. This study will likely resonate. Lots of research efforts focus on police practices and performance across the United States. Collectively speaking, there are unquestionably hundreds of thousands — if not millions — of pages devoted to that subject matter online and on library shelves. Reporters from a national media publication are now adding a few more. OK, a lot more. In fact, a tandem team of researchers from USA Today and a nonprofit group have reportedly just concluded a year-plus effort “creating the biggest collection of police misconduct …